Monday, 29 January 2018

A 1913 Dinner held in the Jordan Gallery on the 1st Floor of the Winter Palace

After you enter the Winter Palace doors from the Neva River and Large Inner Courtyard on the 1st floor, there is a long corridor [Jordan Gallery] with two rows of white columns to the Jordan Staircase.

Photographs (below) of the Jordan Staircase in the Winter Palace


Konstantin Ukhtomsky’s c1850 watercolor (below) of the Entrance to the Jordan Gallery
Nicholas II, Empress Alexandra and their children moved to the Winter Palace on Tuesday February 19th 1913 to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the House of Romanov. The following Saturday while the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna attended the baise-main [kissing of hands with the ladies], Nicholas ‘received the district elders in the lower corridor where a dinner had been organized for them’.

Photographs (below) of the dinner held in the Jordan Gallery on February 23rd 1913 and today looking from the stairs to the corridor


3D Panorama link (below) of the Gallery leading to the Jordan Staircase [note the doors on either side of the staircase that led to the 1st floor storerooms under the Court Ministery offices]


My sister and I have climbed the Jordan, Saltykov, Small Church, Own Majesties and Commandant Staircases many times during our visits to the Hermitage. A lady-in-waiting wrote that there were 90 stairs from the 1st floor to her apartment on the 3rd floor of the Winter Palace. We dare not count how many stairs we have climbed over the years!

11 comments:

  1. The Jordan staircase was one of the first pictures I ever saw of the palace interiors, I was absolutely fascinated by its construction and by how beautiful it was.
    Ghostie x

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  2. Thank you very much. My favorite staircase is the Saltykov. But not the climbing up and down!

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  3. Joanna, thank you so much for having this blog! I have been following for awhile and finally decided to comment- I have been interested in Russian history, especially the Romanovs and their palaces, for years. I am delighted to see a site such as this one and hope to see more of your pictures in the future!

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  4. Thank you very much Tamar. My book is forthcoming and I will continue to share many more photographs and information from my research.

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  5. Awesome! I''ll have to keep an eye out for your book. Are you writing fiction or nonfiction?

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  6. It is nonfictiion - daily life of the imperial family in the Winter Palace!

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    1. I look forward to seeing it! My new novel is actually about the imperial family. It's called "Triumph of a Tsar," and is alternate historical fiction, where the Russian Revolution is averted, and Nicholas II's son Alexei becomes tsar. During the novel, the family spends a lot of time in the Winter Palace, and the Jordan Staircase is prominently on the cover!

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  7. Tamar, Triumph of a Tsar - interesting 1881 to 1920 in the two chapters. Did you take the cover photo of the Jordan Staircase? I am intrigued with you bio of Grand Duke Serge. Did you translate his diaries?

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  8. Hi Joanna, I had a graphic designer make the cover of Triumph of a Tsar. He didn't take your picture of the Jordan Staircase, but I believe he got it from another online source. Chapter 1 provides the (largest) point of departure and explains the main way the Russian Revolution was averted, and then Chapter 2 picks up with Alexei's transition to power. I can understand how it might look like a big jump in time, but I wanted the bulk of the book to be about Alexei's reign. I was actually unable to obtain copies of the last 2 volumes of Serge's diary for my biography, as they were unavailable when I was trying to obtain them. it's something I would try to do differently if I were writing the book today.

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  9. Tamar, a déjà vu moment yesterday. I began reading Deborah Cadbury's new book 'Queen Victoria's Matchmaking' and her prologue began with March 1881 and the death of Alexander II.

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