Sunday, 7 August 2016

Nicholas II’s Curiosity Touring through Different Homes (1)

During the Imperial Family’s visit to Friedberg in 1910, Nicholas II had many opportunities to visit the homes of others in the surrounding area.

He wrote on September 2nd, 1910 “… We went … to Lich – Onor’s hometown [wife of Grand Duke Ernest]. At the castle we met her brother … We looked over the lower floor …”
On September 19th, 1910 he wrote “… to Hohensolms. We had lunch at the owner’s castle, Onor’s brother. We looked over the interior of this old castle, in which there were many old objects …"

Lich Castle is to the south of Geissen in Hesse (photo below).
Hohensolms Castle in Solms is to the west of Geissen (photo below) although I am not certain if this ruin is the former castle Nicholas saw in 1910.



Of course now I would love to visit Lich and Solms and to find out about their archives.
Thank goodness for the Emperor’s curiosity. I feel it validates my own snooping curiosity on the Winter Palace.

5 comments:

  1. The second photo indeed shows Hohensolms Castle (Burg Hohensolms) visited by Nicholas. It is, however, a ruined mediaeval part. The following picture also shows the part that was still inhabited in 1910, with the ruined part on the far left:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f3/Burg_Hohensolms_Sammlung_Duncker.jpg

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    1. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1a/Burg_Hohensolms_05.jpg/800px-Burg_Hohensolms_05.jpg

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  2. Thank you very much. I do like very much the painting. The current photo of the Burg looks as if it is still inhabited. Is it a museum or privately owned?

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  3. According to the German Wikipedia site about the Burg, the property - or considerable parts of it - has been used for youth work and been maintained by the Evangelical Church of Hesse from the 1950s. I don't think there is a museum.

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  4. Lich Castle, on the other hand, has a library/archive with many valuable manuscripts related to the family's history, dating back to the 13th century.

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