Monday, 31 October 2016

Grand Duke’s Bachelor Apartment in the Small Hermitage

In 1859 Grand Duke Nicholas, the son of Alexander II (at 15 years old), moved from the 2nd Spare apartment he shared with his brother Alexander to the Small Hermitage.

The Grand Duke’s bachelor apartment was on the 2nd Floor of the Small Hermitage, facing Palace Square and Millionnaya Ulitisa.

Hau’s 1865 Watercolor (below) of the Grand Duke’s Study


Plan & List of the 2nd Floor of the Small Hermitage
(clique on plan to enlarge)




272                   Corridor (Windows onto Winter Garden)
262                   Romanov Gallery (Southern Part)
258                   Gallery of St. Petersburg Views
257                   Eastern Gallery
258A                 Study of Grand Duke
258B                 Drawing Room of Grand Duke
258C                 Bedroom of Grand Duke (doors to bathroom & staircase)
                        Inner Interior Rooms – Grand Duke’s Governor, Valet, Wardrobes, etc.

Photograph (below) of the Exterior of the Small Hermitage (showing the windows of the plan above)



At the same time in 1859, the ‘State Court of His Imperial Highness Tsarevich’ was formed. The Grand Duke’s staff included 85 people, 36 who directly served him. It appears a staggering number but some were permanent within the various palaces while others migrated with him from palace to palace, i.e. 10 stokers.

Hau’s 1865 Watercolor (below) of the Grand Duke’s Bedroom


After the death of Nicholas in 1865, his brother Alexander moved into the bachelor apartment until his marriage to Dagmar in October 1866.

The former bachelor apartment is now part of the Hermitage library.

Photograph (below) of the Library today




3 comments:

  1. I so much enjoy your posts. Thank you.

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  2. Yes, wonderful posts. Also, if you compare the first and last images, you'll see that the same chandelier remains in situ.

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  3. Thank you very much. That is a great observation Sephilius on the chandelier. I have photographs of the two rooms showing the cornices. It would be a dream to do research in the Hermitage archive!

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