Monday, 24 April 2017

Pasetti in the Malachite Hall of the Winter Palace

During the reign of Nicholas II, luncheons, musical concerts, military and Historical Society meetings were held in the Malachite Hall on the 2nd floor of the Winter Palace.

On Wednesday, March 22nd, 1900 Nicholas wrote “… From 9:15 PM until 12:15 AM we sat in the Malachite Hall and looked at a panorama viewing of the whole Siberian Railroad from the Amur River … to Vladivostok – all of this was amazingly pictured by Pasetti on 1056 pieces of paper. Original, beautiful and curiously interesting…”

Alfred Pasetti, the photographer of the Russian Imperial Court had a studio on the Nevsky Prospekt in St. Petersburg (below).

Photographs (below) of the Malachite Hall c1917 and today.

 


The location of Pasetti’s historical chronicle of the railroad, shown to the Imperial family in 1900, is unknown. A Guide to the Great Siberian Railroad was published by the Ministry of Ways of Communication in 1900 with 360 photographs (below).


3 comments:

  1. It's good to see that the Malachite room hasn't changed too much over time, however I can see that in the black and white photo there were three chandeliers where in the coloured one there is only one, is there a reason why two of them were removed?
    Ghostie x.

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  2. During the 1920s-30s, architect Sivkov renovated the rooms of the Winter Palace for museum use. Balconies, mezzanines, doors etc were dismantled. Chandeliers were also removed. During the Imperial years, there were a number of palace servants who dealt with the cleaning and replacing candles, lightbulbs. After the revolution, museum staff were limited in numbers and the cost to maintain lighting and electricity was high. Today if you look closely, chandeliers are placed closer to the ceiling whereas c1800s/1900s they were lower, giving the rooms a different ambiance.

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  3. Yes, I did notice that and the chandeliers hang from different hangings too.
    Ghostie x.

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